The Endocannabinoid System and How It Balances Our Mind, Body Spirit? 

The Endocannabinoid System and How It Balances Our Mind, Body Spirit? 

What is the endocannabinoid system and how does it benefit our Mind, Body, Spirit? 

Every ‘Body’ has an endocannabinoid system with receptors for cannabinoids.  Cannabinoids balance our endocrine system, which balances homeostasis, which balances health on all levels!

In this educational video medical cannabis expert Dr. Dustin Sulak explains your endocannabinoid system and the role it plays in maintaining harmony and balance within your body. For more free education please view. https://healer.com/

Endocannabinoids are synthesized on‐demand from cell membrane arachidonic acid derivatives and have a local effect and short half‐life before being degraded by the enzymes fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL).

Interestingly, the Cannabis plant uses cannabinoids to promote its own health and prevent disease.

In humans, free radicals cause aging, cancer, and impaired healing, which can lead to a variety of pathologies, from neurodegenerative to immune disorders. Antioxidants found in plants have long been promoted as natural supplements to prevent free radical harm.

In order to understand whether whole plant or single compound may be better for you, please read here

This introduction to the Endocannabinoid System has been written thanks to the brilliant yearly review of recent scientific literature of “Emerging clinical applications of cannabis and cannabinoids by Paul Armentino, Deputy Diector of NORML (Check and support their work if you read from the States!) They have a gift for concise and educational summary and I felt it was the best approach (compared to the peer-reviewed publication model I often adopt), in order to introduce the basics of the Endocannabinoid System.

Spread consciousness and smile more!

read more – https://naturegoingsmart.com/understanding-endocannabinoid-system/

Marijuana Banking Bill Approved By Congressional Committee

Marijuana Banking Bill Approved By Congressional Committee

American Banking has finally risen to a new level for the cannabis world and the Marijuana Banking Bill has been approved by the Congressional Committee. A congressional committee voted on Thursday to approve legislation aimed at increasing marijuana businesses’ access to banks.

WATCH LIVE  – Following multiple days of lengthy debate and consideration of several amendments, the House Financial Services Committee voted 45 to 15 to advance the legislation to the full body.

Floor action has not yet been scheduled, but cannabis reform advocates are hopeful that the committee approval of the banking bill is a sign Democrats are ready to move broad marijuana reforms this year.

Indeed, House Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern (D-MA) said in a radio interview on Wednesday that he expects the chamber to vote on legislation to end federal marijuana prohibition within a matter of “weeks.”

“We will guide it to the House floor for a vote, which I think it will pass with an overwhelming vote—Democrats and I think a lot of Republicans as well,” he said. “If we have a strong bipartisan vote that will increase the pressure on the Senate to do something.”

Repost from – https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2019/03/28/marijuana-banking-bill-approved-by-congressional-committee/?fbclid=IwAR3W67mF-WDZ6c4HZxfQjw9Ges8kIxEyfDQztFlFrCODcX42vPvi-D9tuWg#7ba683f22ce1

Staggering Growth Predicted for CBD Industry as Impact of Farm Bill Seen

Staggering Growth Predicted for CBD Industry as Impact of Farm Bill Seen

Following the passing of the 2018 Farm Bill, CBD sales have continued their massive growth in the United States and beyond.

  • Cannabidiol (CBD), a chemical found in cannabis, has seen a huge growth in sales over the past few years.
  • CBD can be derived from hemp, and the passing of a new farm bill in the States makes this form of cultivation legal at a federal level.
  • This forms part of wider growth in the cannabis market, as companies expand their operations in North Americaand even beyond.

Wildflower Brands Inc. is among the companies benefiting from this market, with an increase of more than 300 percent in online sales for its CBD products last year. Tilray Inc. is expanding with its acquisition of hemp foods company Manitoba Harvest. Canopy Growth Corporation announced revenue for its fiscal third quarter rose more than 280 percent compared to a year ago. In December, Cronos Group Inc. announced that tobacco company Altria would be taking a $1.8 billion stake in the company. Aphria has just completed expansion projects that allows it to substantially increase its output.

CBD Drives Growth for Hemp

Hemp, a plant that has long been out of the public eye, is returning to the spotlight in a big way. A non-intoxicating form of cannabis, hemp was primarily used for centuries as a natural source of fibers, which were used in cloth, rope and even building materials. Many ships in the great age of sailing relied on hemp for their riggings.

But in the sweeping anti-drug crusades of the 20th century, hemp became caught up in attacks on cannabis. Campaigners who were determined to save consumers from their own pleasures had cannabis outlawed at a time when there was little effective way of distinguishing between hemp and other forms of cannabis. No longer needed for cloth and rigging, hemp was made illegal. Now all that has changed – nowhere more dramatically than in the United States of America.

 

The Farm Bill

Hemp is making a comeback thanks to the growing popularity of cannabidiol (CBD), an active ingredient found in many forms of cannabis. It’s an ingredient that companies such as Wildflower Brands Inc. a creator of plant-based health and wellness products, have been making extensive use of in recent years. Combined with other naturally occurring plant compounds, full-spectrum CBD is used in a range of Wildflower products, including capsules, topicals, soaps, tinctures and vaporizers.

Until recently, the production of CBD in the United States faced serious restrictions and uncertainties. Many states had legalized the production of cannabis in some form, either for medical or for recreational use. In addition, there were licensed trials of the cultivation of hemp, which can be rich in CBD. But all of these plants were illegal at a federal level, meaning that even with state-level approval, cultivators faced financial limitations and the threat of government action.

All that changed in December with the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill. One of a regular series of bills governing the U.S. agricultural sector, this bill removes hemp from the list of controlled substances, making it unambiguously legal for farmers to grow hemp. This changes the landscape for CBD products in the States. Companies such as Wildflower, which has already got its products into many outlets in the health and wellness sector, will be able to expand their reach even further.

States have the right to set their own rules around restricted substances, and some states have taken an unsympathetic attitude to CBD. The Farm Bill doesn’t force states to change this attitude, but there are already signs that public opinion on all levels are changing. The regulations in many states assume adherence to the federal guidelines, and some states, such as Alabama, have already softened their stance since the Farm Bill became law.

Under the Farm Bill, hemp production will be tightly regulated. Most states already have existing regulations in place, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture will be developing its own regulations as well. But for an established company such as Wildflower, which already works in CaliforniaWashington and New York, this shouldn’t be a problem.

Cannabis companies are accustomed to working in a tightly controlled environment and meeting the legal standards set by state legislators, as well as the product standards required by retail outlets. In that context, working within new federal regulations shouldn’t present a significant challenge, while the existence of consistent national standards will create opportunities for growth.

CBD Demand Grows

The Farm Bill has been driven in large part by the growing demand for CBD. An obscure and seldom discussed chemical a decade ago, CBD has emerged as an important consumer product. The gradual legalization of cannabis and research into its medical effects drew attention to the fact that those benefits were not all related to THC, the psychoactive chemical that gets cannabis users high. Identified as a chemical with great potential for health and wellness, CBD has started to be marketed in its own right and is used in products such as the Wildflower Wellness line.

Public interest in CBD has grown seemingly from nowhere. Tapping into interest in both cannabis and natural remedies, and offering treatments that may succeed where others have failed, CBD sales have soared. Hemp-derived CBD alone was a $390 million market in 2018 and is expected to reach $1.3 billion by 2022. And that doesn’t even include all the CBD products derived from other forms of cannabis.

The results for producers have been staggering.  Wildflower saw its online sales grow by more than 300 percent in just nine months in 2018. In response, the company opened its first New York retail store, a sure sign of a product’s popularity in an age when so many companies are shedding their brick-and-mortar presence.

Looked at globally, CBD is in even better health. The Brightfield Group has estimated that CBD’s value will reach $5.7 billion this year and $22 billion by 2022. While research on the topic is still in its infancy, there is growing evidence that CBD could be used to treat a number of ailments, including certain extreme forms of childhood epilepsy. Even the United Kingdom, a country whose government remains staunchly opposed to the legalization of cannabis, has allowed the use of a CBD drug for this purpose.

Companies producing and selling CBD products are springing up across North AmericaEurope and beyond. Demand is growing, especially among millennials. That’s bolstering the impressive sales of companies such as Wildflower and putting pressure on politicians to further liberalize the laws around hemp.

Making the Most of a New Market

A lot of companies are now making the most of the growing popularity of cannabis, CBD and hemp. With its acquisition of Manitoba Forest, is tapping into an extensive U.S. distribution network and an upcoming line of CBD products.

Manitoba Harvest sells hemp-based granola, protein powder, milk and other food products at more than 13,000 points of sale across the United States.

Canopy Growth Corporation impressive increase in sales was boosted by the company’s first sales of legal recreational marijuana in Canada, which accounted for more than 70 percent of gross revenue. Chairman and co-CEO Bruce Linton attributed the lift to the company’s decision to make early, “meaningful” investments that helped it corner a big part of the Canadian market when the law took effect. Canopy Growth is a world-leading diversified cannabis and hemp company, offering distinct brands and curated cannabis varieties in dried, oil and softgel capsule forms.

HEMP THE WORLD – Begin in your state!

HEMP THE WORLD – Begin in your state!

Hemp Cultivation is moving into full swing in the US despite challenges in state-to-state regulations supporting the farmer, the consumer and the state. The main point is to Hemp the World, and bring natural resource sustainability back to all life!’ Darlene Mea, comments

As you might remember, a few months ago, the Roundtable’s intrepid attorneys at Frost Brown Todd identified a provision buried in the statutes of more than a dozen states – when there was a federal de-classification of a drug, the state must follow suit.

This led to an obvious conclusion – hemp should be removed from drug control in these states.

 

Our voice was heard.

This week, we heard back from the Texas Health and Human Services Commission. Their Commissioner reviewed our letter and agreed: and on March 15, he filed a regulatory amendment declassifying hemp as a controlled substance. 

Of course, there’s more work to be done.

An important bill has been filed by Rep. Tracy King which would not only establish a hemp growing program in the Lone Star State but also make 100% clear that hemp products such as CBD could be sold at retail. Read more here.

We need your help: 

Head over to our State Action Center.

There you will insert your address, and with the click of a button you can fire off your own letter to your legislators in Austin, encouraging them to support hemp farmers and hemp products for consumers. 


 
If you don’t live in Texas, please share this portal with your friends in Lone Star State, as well as all of your social media contacts, helping us keep the pressure on Texas policymakers.  As we’ve proven so often in the past, when we share our voices, politicians listen.

STATE ACTION

 

 

The Amazing Characteristics of Hemp

The Amazing Characteristics of Hemp

We were charmed by this quote, which was written by Yitzac Goldstein of Earth Protex, many years ago:

“Before Huang-Ti’s time 
clothing was made from skins of birds and animals. But as time went on people increased and animals were few causing great hardship. So Huang-Ti ordained that clothing should be made from hemp fiber. This is how the spiritual leader changed matters for the people’s benefit.” – 6th century A.D. historian Khung Ying-Ta on
The Yellow Emperor, Huang-Ti, 27th century B.C.

I love hemp, maybe just because of the lore associated with the plant – and I don’t mean the lore surrounding the hallucinogenic properties of the plants that are bred for high THC content!  So let’s get that part out of the way fast:
Hemp is another word for the plant Cannabis sativa. Yes, marijuana comes from this same plant genus – and so does hops, used to produce beer for millennia. But what we call “industrial hemp” is a different variety (or subspecies), called Cannabis sativa sativa.  Marijuana is from Cannabis sativa indica, which is bred to contain between 5 – 10% of the intoxicating substance delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC.  Industrial hemp, Cannabis sativa sativa, contains less than one tenth that amount.

Industrial grade hemp is not marijuana – it doesn’t look the same and if you tried to smoke it you’d probably die of carbon monoxide poisoning before you felt anything but sick. For more about the differences between the two varieties click here or go to the Industrial Hemp website.

Hemp is unique among other crops in that every part of the plant has utility and potential market value.  Here are some interesting facts about hemp that contribute to the lore I’m referring to:

  • In 1941 Henry Ford built a car with a plastic made from hemp and wheat straw.
  • Both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp on their plantations; in fact the colonial government mandated that people grow hemp.  Settlers used hemp fiber as money and to pay taxes.
  • The original Levi Strauss jeans were made from hemp.
  • The July 4, 1776 Declaration of Independence  was written on hemp paper.

The plant has been used for millennia for food, fibers and fuel.   Today it is said that over 30,000 different products can be made from hemp.  Hemp’s oilseed makes high-grade food and beauty products.  The stalks produce fiber and cellulose.  And today, because of its length and strength, hemp fiber is woven into natural advanced composites, which can then be fashioned into anything from fast food containers to skateboard decks to the body of a stealth fighter.  There are over two million cars on the road today with hemp composite components.

The plant has been used for millennia for food, fibers and fuel.  Today it is said that over 30,000 different products can be made from hemp.  Hemp’s oilseed makes high-grade food and beauty products.  The stalks produce fiber and cellulose.  And today, because of its length and strength, hemp fiber is woven into natural advanced composites, which can then be fashioned into anything from fast food containers to skateboard decks to the body of a stealth fighter.  There are over two million cars on the road today with hemp composite components.

But hemp for luxurious fabrics? I remember those macramé plant hangers that were all the rage in the 1970’s. Hemp has a public relations campaign to wage, because when I thought of hemp a few years ago (before my enlightenment) all I could imagine was burlap bag and sisal rugs. Turns out the technical revolution has even found hemp: new developments from the 1980’s in retting and processing the stalks has meant that the hemp fibers produced today are soft and lustrous enough for even the finest fabrics.

Many end users look for comfort and durability in choosing a fabric, so hemp’s softness and high abrasion resistance make it a competitive choice. Hemp fiber’s positive qualities have been recognized over thousands of years of real life applications. The texture of pure hemp textiles resembles that of flax linen, appealing to the eye with its subtle variations in thickness, but it is also versatile and can be blended with other fibers to create many different looks. Hemp’s versatility as a textile is stunning: hemp fibers can be woven alone or with other fibers to produce weaves from rugged canvas to the lightest, silkiest gauze, in an unlimited array of colors and finishes. Hemp has a beautiful natural luster and a lush hand and drape not found with any other natural or synthetic fiber, even linen.

Hemp’s characteristics as a textile make it a desirable choice in many applications:

  • Hemp is stronger and more durable than any other natural fabric, including linen, which almost matches hemps abrasion resistance and tensile strength. The result is that hemp has a longer lifespan than other natural fabrics.(Patagonia is just one of the many companies which has published studies which demonstrate hemp’s superior strength; results for these studies range from 3 to 8 times stronger.) Products made from hemp will outlast their competitors by many years.
  • Not only is hemp strong, but it also holds its shape, stretching less than any other natural fiber. This prevents hemp fabric used in upholstery, demountable panels, acoustic paneling or as wallcovering from stretching out or becoming distorted with use.
  • Hemp fabric withstands, even benefits from, commercial laundering. Its inherent luster and light reflective qualities are enhanced by washing; it becomes finer and more luxurious with use. Hemp also possesses excellent soil-release properties because it sheds a microscopic layer each time it is laundered. This eliminates soiling and exposes a fresh surface. In effect, this means that hemp retains its sleek sheen every time it is washed, that it never dulls, and that it releases stains more easily than other fabrics.
  • Hemp may be known for its durability, but its comfort and style are second to none. The more hemp is used, the softer it gets: it wears in, not out, thriving on regular use and machine washing without suffering fabric degradation. Hemp actually becomes softer, more resilient and more lustrous as a result of washing.
  • Hemp’s superior absorbency, due to its porous nature, means that it is very breathable and quick drying. Hemp can absorb up to 20% its own weight while still feeling dry to the touch (vs. polyester, which can absorb a maximum of 6%). This is important in the case of any fabric that is in contact with human skin, such as sheets, as perspiration is rapidly absorbed. It feels cooler in summer yet during cool weather, air which is trapped in the fibers is warmed by the body, making it naturally warm.
  • Hemp’s absorbency allows it to accept dyes readily and retain color better than other natural fibers, including cotton.
  • Hemp has a high resistance to ultraviolet light; it will not fade or disintegrate from sunlight as quickly as other natural fibers. (Tilly Endurables introduced a new hat in 2004 after testing its hemp fabric to a UPF of 50+, the maximum ultraviolet protection rating given.[2]) UV damage is especially a problem for draperies and marine interiors, so hemp would be a good natural fiber choice for these applications.
  • Hemp fiber is highly resistant to rotting, and its resistance to mildew, mold and salt water led to its premier use in marine fittings: the majority of all twine, rope, ship’s sails, rigging and nets up to the late 19th century were made from hemp. The word canvas itself is derived from cannabis.
  • Finally, any product made of hemp is fully biodegradable and easily recyclable.

Hemp as a crop is also a standout. The bio-regional model of agriculture focuses on obtaining high value for the resources of the local land, recycling the waste and end products ad infinitum and thereby creating a “closed circle” of farming and industry. Hemp is an elegant solution to the crises created by modern agribusiness and conventional cotton production because:

  • Hemp grows well without the use of chemicals: usually no pesticides or fungicides are used because it has few serious fungus or pest problems – although the degree of immunity to attacking organisms has been greatly exaggerated. Several insects and fungi specialize exclusively in hemp! But despite this, the use of pesticides and fungicides are usually unnecessary to get a good yield. No herbicides are generally used because dense plantings shade out weeds; no defoliants are needed (as they are with machine harvested cotton) because the dried foliage is not a problem for harvesting.
  • Hemp requires less water to thrive than cotton – is actually drought tolerant – and usually grows well without irrigation. Globally, 77% of cotton crops are irrigated.

The most widespread claim for the environmental friendliness of hemp is that it has the potential to save trees that otherwise would be harvested for the production of pulp. If hemp reduces the need to harvest trees for building materials or other products, its use as a wood substitute will tend to contribute to preserving biodiversity. Hemp may also enhance forestry management by responding to short-term fiber demand while trees reach their ideal maturation. In developing countries where fuel wood is becoming increasingly scarce and food security is a concern, the introduction of a dual-purpose crop such as hemp to meet food, shelter, and fuel needs may contribute significantly to preserving biodiversity.

This story originally appeared at O Eco Textiles