‘All of a sudden, my 40,000 followers want to grow hemp’

‘All of a sudden, my 40,000 followers want to grow hemp’

Game Changers are visionary leaders perceive challenges and growth opportunities before they happen, positioning people to produce extraordinary results that make real contributions to life. Richard Rose is a true game changer who knows how to share his knowledge with the world and create impact that is priceless!  ‘All of a sudden, my 40,000 followers want to grow hemp’ is a superhero story in our book! Thank you to HempToday for your continued excellent journalism and sharing as well!  Darlene Mea, CEO HempingtonPost 

INTERVIEWAmerican hemp legend Richard Rose recently released a treasure trove of reports, scientific papers and other documents about hemp online at The Richard Rose Report. Richard, who’s living in Italy these days, tells HempToday why he believes in the open source information model and talks about his mania: work.

HempToday: Why the release of these resources now?

Richard Rose: The passing of the (U.S.) 2018 Farm Bill catalyzed an explosion in interest in hemp, especially farming and CBD processing. Since I’ve made about 1,000 original educational posts on mostly CBD and Hemp since 2014, I have about 40,000 followers on social media. And seemingly every last one suddenly wants to grow hemp, but few understand what’s actually involved. So to help them, I decided to do The Richard Rose Report to offer my thoughts on emerging issues, and free documents to explain them.

HT: Why not just stay on Facebook to do it?

RR: Because the day Trump signed the Farm Bill, Facebook shut down my advertising account; thus the handwriting was on the wall. Hemp has never had as many problems as it does today, post-“legalization.” I do not believe that is an accident: the more fear in the space, the more people will hire lawyers, lobbyists, and associations to hold their hand.

HT: Why are you giving this information away instead of selling it?

FULL STORY HEMPTODAY

Australian philanthropists back hemp initiatives in USA

Australian philanthropists back hemp initiatives in USA

It continues to be exciting as we watch the new sprouts of the Hemp industry popping up everywhere.  I say by this time next year our country will be in full swing with the Hemp industry productions of much more than CBD.  Now already there is a HempPlastic Plant in Boulder Colorado, Hemp Air Filters out of Arizona and Hemp Wood processing in Kentucky.  This is only the beginning of the 25,000+ possible products made from Hemp that will soon be a part of our American sustainable living culture…

Here’s another great post from HempToday!

A new fund launched by Australian philanthropists Barry and Joy Lambert will provide a $2 million boost to the U.S. state of Pennsylvania’s hemp industry by supporting initiatives at Thomas Jefferson University which promote the crop.

The money will be used to establish the Lambert Innovation Fund within Jefferson’s Innovation Pillar, and to invest in hemp companies in the region. “The Lambert Innovation Fund will enable us to link ideas to impact” Stephen Klasko, president of Thomas Jefferson University told local media.

Funding innovationThe Jefferson Innovation Pillar encourages and fosters ideas with the goal of converting them into products and services. To date, Jefferson has licensed more than 100 inventions and started more than 25 new ventures that have gone on to raise upwards of $200 million

In 2016, the Lambert couple gifted Thomas Jefferson University $3 million towards medicinal cannabis and hemp research with the establishment of the Lambert Center for the Study of Medicinal Cannabis and Hemp.

See More at Hemp Today

 

U.S. firm plans $5.8 million factory to produce ‘HempWood’

U.S. firm plans $5.8 million factory to produce ‘HempWood’

A Maryland, USA company says it will invest $5.8 million in a factory in Kentucky to produce HempWood, an “eco-friendly timber” that uses hemp fiber to create a wood-like material.

The company, Fibonacci LLC, said it has secured a lease on an 11,000 sq. ft. facility in western Kentucky and plans to begin production this summer. Fibonacci owner Greg Wilson said he has contracted for delivery of more than 800 tons of hemp stalks from Kentucky growers to get operations up and running.

See the full story at HempToday

U.S. Jumps to No. 3 Among Top Hemp Growing Nations

U.S. Jumps to No. 3 Among Top Hemp Growing Nations

This post was originally published on HempToday.net. Subscribe to our newsletter, check out our events and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

The USA has jumped into the top ranks of global hemp growing nations, recording a tripling of land under hemp to reach a total 78,176 acres (about 31,000 hectares) in 2018, according to the American hemp advocacy group Vote Hemp. Vote Hemp had recorded about 25,000 acres of hemp fields across the USA in 2017. Twenty-three states grew hemp in 2018, Vote Hemp said.

Globally, that puts the USA third, behind world leader China (400,000 acres/162,000 ha.) and northern neighbor Canada (100,000 acres/40,000 ha), and is nearly double the land sown for hemp in France (42,000 acres/17,000 ha.), Europe’s leading hemp grower. Only about 110,000 acres (44,000 ha.) of hemp were grown across all of Europe in 2017, the year for which the most recent figures are available.

Montana expands fast

The rapid expansion of hemp fields in the USA last year was driven primarily by anticipated passage of the U.S. Farm Bill, which removed hemp from the U.S. narcotics list. The Bill became law in late December. Strong demand for CBD was a major contributing factor in the growth of U.S. fields.

Internally in the U.S., Montana recorded the most fields under hemp last year with 22,000 acres (about 9,000 ha.), a drastic increase over the 542 acres (219 ha.) sown in 2017. Montana eclipsed perennial hemp leader Colorado, which was the second biggest grower in the USA last year with 21,578 acres (8,700 ha.), Vote Hemp reported.

41 states are active

Forty-one U.S. states have defined industrial hemp as distinct and removed barriers to its production: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.